Soziale Stadt  

 

Gender Mainstreaming: Conference "Future City – Diverse City"

Methods


The Focus Group Method


The method of working with focus groups, that has its origins in the USA, is in Germany applied in market research, but increasingly also in qualitative social sciences research and in formative evaluation processes. Generally, focus groups provide the opportunity to discuss in groups from six up to fifteen people, who were selected for this group following certain criteria. They discuss on the basis of a prepared input and given questions that are usually sent to the group members, precedent to the meeting. In the context of this conference, this input is basic information on the respective thematic challenges of Berlin urban development.

The method is of particular efficiency to gain in-depth knowledge on specific target groups, their mindsets or positions concerning specific problems. In research contexts, it is important to have a series of chaired focus groups on one and the same problem. In the context of this conference, all focus groups will after an introduction to the challenges in the respective Berlin urban development's field of action discuss three cross-sectional questions on gender diversity aspects within these fields of action.

The process and results of the focus-groups will be documented with meta-plan-technique and – as far as possible – by minutes based on recording. The focus group method supports the principle of in analytic processes. Particularly in professionally heterogenic groups, it proved to be efficient for the quick production of knowledge to be used in strategic processes or the development of models.

20x20: The PechaKucha presentation format


Where does the term "PechaKucha" come from?

PechaKucha is a Japanese onomatopoeic word, describing the sound of many people talking. Whereas there are of course other presentation formats using a "pre-timed" power-point-presentation, this particular presentation method, that we actually don't use in their version, was developed in 2003 by Klein Dytham Architects. Today, this presentation format it is not only applied in areas such as design, art, fashion and architecture, but also in science and economy. In many cities around the world, also so-called PechaKucha-Nights with a series of such presentations are organized, usually by non-commercial actors.

How does this presentation format work?

Each person presenting has a restricted time-budget of 6 minutes and 40 seconds. In the Version Klein and Dytham designed, during this time 20 images are shown, each for 20 seconds. Following their concept, the slides may only show images. Free of text and graphs, they automatically switch automatically to the next slide, if the slide's time-slot is over. In Berlin conferences on urban development, it proved to be more successful and comprehensive for these target-groups to include one thematic slogan or thesis in each slide and also, it is "allowed" to use diagrams or graphs. The selection of the images is done by the person doing the presentation.

What are its advantages?

The audience can listen to entertaining and concise speeches that provide a quick and general idea of a topic and allow a focus on mutual questions or cross-sectional questions in a series of presentations. The strict timing results in a focus on the most relevant contents and challenges the lecturer to apply creative way of presentation.

What do you have to take in account if you use this format for our conference?

All known versions of this presentation format require intensive preparation: The contents must be presented concisely and comprehensible, neglecting an in-depth perspective. To do so, the lecturer should have a clear objective what he or she wants to convey to the audience. Despite the technically limited time, one should not let oneself be rushed by this time-regime, but speak slowly and clearly. In contrast to other forms of presentation nothing can be added at the end of the presentation, speech and slides must fit perfectly and there is no time for delays and or to produce a spoonerism. The selection of the images should be done very carefully: they should neither be too detailed nor contain clip arts. Furthermore, the person presenting must have the copyright on the images or use publicly shared / open source images.

Sources:
(last visited in February 2013)