Berlin Monument Authority  

 

Industry and Technology

Wasserwerk Friedrichshagen


Wasserwerk Friedrichshagen

Wasserwerk Friedrichshagen Müggelseedamm 301-307, 308/310,
Köpenick; 1889-93 by Schultze and Gill; with on-site garden


The Wasserwerk Friedrichshagen is located in a picturesque setting in the park-like landscape on the bank of the Müggelsee. It was built by Richard Schultze from 1888-93 in the style of the Gothic cloisters of the Mark Brandenburg and according to the technical plans of Henry Gill. At the time it was the largest and most modern water works system in Europe. Although it was originally intended to process only surface water, ground water processing systems were constructed from 1903-06; from 1925-27 electrical conveyance technology was installed. The buildings are separated and grouped according to function (water-pumping and production machine buildings, sewage systems, slow-filter systems, conveyance machine buildings), but are networked to separate output strands so that only partial capacities would be affected in case of natural disaster or technical malfunction. Individual structures were designed according to their functional significance: the pump machine houses, for instance, were constructed in the style of palaces with representative façades facing the lake. All of the buildings constructed later remained true to Schultze's architectural model and thus fit harmoniously into the ensemble. The old installations of the water works of Friedrichshagen have since been shut down. A water works museum has been created in pump machine houses B and C.