Berlin Monument Authority  

 

Archeological Monuments

Stadtmauer


Stadtmauer

Stadtmauer, Waisenstraße, Mitte;
1250/90, raised in the fourteenth century, secured in 1948


The oldest city map portraying the course of the medieval city fortifications of Berlin and Cölln is from the year 1652. It was drafted by Johann Gregor Memhardt, who directed the construction of new fortifications for the Elector Friedrich Wilhelm from 1658. During this construction, the medieval double trench before the wall was filled in on the Berlin side. The city wall remained preserved to the north of the Stralau Gate. Between this wall and the new ramparts, a street was built. This street remains intact today as "Littenstrasse" between the river Spree (Stralau Gate) and the Klosterkirche. The height of the remaining city wall varies between 3.0 and 5.0 m. It was built of boulders and bricks with the foundations predominantly of boulders. When the public house Zur letzten Instanz was rebuilt in 1961, foundations of the city wall underwent archeological examination. It was determined during excavation that they reached a depth of 1.8 m and a thickness of up to 1.2 m. In a second investigation near the Klosterkirche in 1965, a wall thickness of 3.5 m was determined. A number of beam holes and a distinct ledge at a height of 4 m on the inside originate from a parapet wall for a defense corridor toward the back. In one position at approximately the same height there are three openings believed to be firing slits. The restoration of the approximately 120 meters of the city wall still preserved was completed in 1984. A new surprise in 1996 was the discovery of additional fragments of the city wall between the southern end of the restored wall and Stralauer Strasse. Demolition of the buildings at Littenstrasse 105 and its extension to the rear, Waisenstrasse 3, exposed the city side of the wall's outer shell. The thickness of the wall remains was between 20 and 45 cm and could be documented for a length of approximately 8 meters.